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2011 Pop Culture Challenge: Status Update

Back in November, 2010, spurred by my decision to read the most banned books in the States (as listed for Banned Books Week), I challenged myself to finally get off my lazy ass and ‘catch up’ on all of the pop culture and reading I always ‘meant to’ finish.  This is the first major status update.

So, four months into a thirteen-month series of challenges, I figured it was time to reflect on my progress, and also, on the recently enjoyed items on my lists.  For those interested in the full extent of the challenge, list items and the original posts, click the 2011 Pop Culture Challenge tab in the header.

We’ll take this by categories, for simplicity.

Literature
Progress:  2 new items crossed off on American list, 1 on Canadian

For all of the reading I’ve done as of late, I confess much of it was pleasure reading done without the list as a guide.  That said, one item I’ve crossed off both lists was really 7 books, so I deserve some credit.

I’ve polished off Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, which was not remotely a book that should be banned.  It wasn’t graphic, and it was appropriate for YA readers.  I personally found it a bit dull, truth be told, but a worthwhile read.

My other checklist completion was finally reading the Harry Potter books, and, with a few exceptions, they were really well done.  I don’t know that I would endlessly reread them or anything, but I enjoyed the journey, for the most part, and liked the end (even if it felt a little too easily achieved).  My favourite of the series was Goblet of Fire, followed closely by Chamber of Secrets.  I’m glad I got off my ass and gave them a go, and much thanks to my little brother, who never lends anyone his books… but lent me the first four.

Television
Progress:  1 new series tried; 2 caught up; others in progress

This is where I’ve made most of my headway; it’s easiest for me to find time and the attention span to watch an episode or two and then scurry off.  TV shows are also easier to find to watch than 150 movies, know what I mean?

Fiance and I finally tried out The Walking Dead and being zombie nuts, we loved it.  We knew we would, but we were so lazy about watching it.  Not having cable is a massive hindrance.  I was a little mixed about the ending of the season, but overall very satisfied and ready for the next.  This show really needs to be seen, because it is about more than zombies; it`s about humanity itself, in any crisis.  It`s what I wished 28 Days Later had been (the ending’s always irked me, because I wanted to know what happened!).

We also finally caught up on Dexter (three seasons plus!) and I have loved them, with the exception of season 3, which just pissed me off.  I think season 2 is the best overall, followed closely by 4.  I wish the Trinity Killer had been used to greater potential; I feel the reveal was way too soon, and we needed more suspense.  I loved Lithgow, though.  The Lumen story in 5 was patchy and hit or miss, but overall good.  Such a fucking good show.

I also finally watched all of South Park… This show really has aged well, far better than I even predicted.  LOVE.  It sometimes misses, but given how many episodes there are, whatever.

I’m currently in progress with Heroes (loved season 3, mixed on season 4 so far) and Robot Chicken (pure genius!).  Now that we have Netflix, this is even easier for me.  Whee!

Films
Progress:  7 new films seen

I’ve begun attacking the films list more thoroughly lately, being as it is so long and I have so many other obligations.  Part of the issue lies in tracking all of them down, of course, particularly older or more obscure films.  That aside, of the films I’ve seen, I’ve been quite happy about doing so.

The most recent one, M, is fantastic, and I never woud have even heard of this 80 or so year-old film without taking this challenge on.  It’s in German with subtitles, which I know aggravates some people, but it’s an insightful look at serial killers and how their crimes affect the public, society on the whole, and the killer himself.  Slumdog Millionaire was a long overdue viewing, as was The Wrestler; both should be seen by film afficionados.  The JJ Abrams reboot of Star Trek was pretty bad-ass, and unlike my Trekkie fiance, I rather enjoy Zachary Quinto as Spock.  Kick-Ass?  I’ve already REWATCHED that one.  The Departed?  It’s what Lock, Stock… wishes it was, even if the ending irked me.

But The Social Network is my big one, thus far, because it, by all rights, shouldn’t work on paper.  And yet, the casting, the score (fuck yeah, Trent!), the way it’s shot and paced…  I love it.  It’s truly one of the best films I’ve seen in years because, in so many ways, it’s subtle to pitch-perfection, and in your face in others.  Jesse Eisenberg’s performance makes it, and it was totally robbed for the Oscar.

I know that ahead lies a bunch of movies I have zero interest in (wtf, IMDB voters, with all the mobster and sci-fi action shit?), but for now, it’s been a blast.

See you in a few months… and hopefully, with a much more diligent progress report…

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New Year’s Resolutions

Everyone else is doing it, right?  Seriously though, without committing to things in writing, I never get them done.

1.  Get down to low weight by Halloween (don’t ask the number; it’s impolite ;)
2.  Mail out the holiday goodies I owe peeps.
3.  Meditate regularly.
4.  Go back to school!
5.  Complete the 2011 Pop Culture Challenge I designed.

Regarding that last one, I gave myself a head start at the end of 2010.  As of the start of this year, here’s my progress!

Movies seen: Blade Runner, The Social Network
TV Show Progress: Caught up on South Park; Seen all of The Walking Dead; Am now at 4X08 of Dexter (2 seasons’ gain approx).
Books: Read Books1-4 of Harry Potter series.

I’ll post updates bimonthly on my progress, just to make my sorry ass more accountable.

I Never Promised You A Rose Garden    Joanne Greenberg
Invisible Monsters    Chuck Palahniuk
The Final Warning    James Patterson
Max    James Patterson
The Last Vampire    Christopher Pike
The Immortal    Christopher Pike
Sharp Objects    Gillian Flynn
Whisper of Death    Christopher Pike
The Further Adventures of a London Call Girl    Brooke Magnanti
Thirteen Reasons Why    Jay Asher
Twisted    Laurie Halse Anderson
Weekend    Christopher Pike
LV2: Black Blood    Christopher Pike
LV3: Red Dice    Christopher Pike
LV4: Phantom    Christopher Pike
LV5: Evil Thirst    Christopher Pike
LV6: Creatures of Forever    Christopher Pike
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Goals For 2011: Literature (Part Two)

I’ve finally tracked a list of banned and challenged books from Canada since this 60s, and have decided that since there’s a lot of different titles on this list as compared to the American banned books I plan to devour, I will add these to my goals as well. I have omitted French language books, magazines and similar anothologies of them, as well as materials I know will be impossible to locate through my resources.  I’m only going to tackle the last ten years, to keep it on par with my previous goals.

You can see the expansive pdf, with details of the challenges and many of the results here.  Books I’ve read are in bold.

Canadian Challenged and Banned Books List

Takes One To Know One: An Alison Kaine Mystery – Kate Allen
Something To Tell – Ann Alma
The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
In the Heat of the Night – John Ball
Color Psychology and Color Therapy: A Factual Study of the Influence of Color on Human Life – Faber Birren
Glory Days and Other Stories – Gillian Chan
Extraordinary Evil: A Brief History of Genocide – Barbara Coloroso
Wild Fire – Nelson DeMille
The Homoerotic Photograph: Male Images from Durieu/Delacroix to Mapplethorpe – Allen Ellenzweig
Three Wishes: Palestinian and Israeli Children Speak – Deborah Ellis
Snow Falling On Cedars – David Guterson
Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying – Dereh Humphry
Hitler’s War – David Irving
A Little Piece of Ground – Elizabeth Laird
To Kill A Mockingbird – Harper Lee
Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art – Richard Meyer
Outrageously Alice – Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
Silent Witness – Richard North Patterson
Waging War From Canada – Mike Pearson
The New York City Bartender’s Joke Book – Jimmy Pritchard
His Dark Materials series – Philip Pullman
Harry Potter series – J.K. Rowling

The Seduction of Peter S – Lawrence Sanders
Greasy, Grimy, Gopher Guts: The Subversive Folklore of Children – TKF Weiskopf and Josepha Sherman
Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
Trouble on Tarragon Island – Nikki Tate
Black Like Kyra, White Like Me – Judith Vigna
What We Don’t Know About Children – Simona Vinci
Paul Kagame and Rwanda: Power, Genocide and the Rwandan Patriotic Front – Colin M Waugh
Daddy’s Roommate – Michael Willhoite

Total Read At Start:  2/30

Follow my progress on the tab at the top of the blog!

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Goals For 2011: Literature

I posted over on my fanfiction blog about Banned Books Week and the list released of the 100 most challenged books in the United States in schools etc.  I decided, out of spite, to try and read as many of them as possible for fun.  Transferring that list here to keep my goals tidy, may I present the list of most challenged books of the last decade.

Books I’ve read are in bold.

The Top 100 Banned Books of 2000-2009

1. Harry Potter (series), by J.K. Rowling
2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three, by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Myracle, Lauren
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
11. Fallen Angels, by Walter Dean Myers
12. It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris
13. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
14. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
15. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
16. Forever, by Judy Blume
17. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
18. Go Ask Alice, by Anonymous
19. Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger

20. King and King, by Linda de Haan
21. To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
22. Gossip Girl (series), by Cecily von Ziegesar
23. The Giver, by Lois Lowry
24. In the Night Kitchen, by Maurice Sendak
25. Killing Mr. Griffin, by Lois Duncan
26. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
27. My Brother Sam Is Dead, by James Lincoln Collier
28. Bridge To Terabithia, by Katherine Paterson
29. The Face on the Milk Carton, by Caroline B. Cooney
30. We All Fall Down, by Robert Cormier
31. What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones
32. Bless Me, Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
33. Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson
34. The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things, by Carolyn Mackler
35. Angus, Thongs, and Full Frontal Snogging, by Louise Rennison
36. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
37. It’s So Amazing, by Robie Harris
38. Arming America, by Michael Bellasiles
39. Kaffir Boy, by Mark Mathabane
40. Life is Funny, by E.R. Frank
41. Whale Talk, by Chris Crutcher
42. The Fighting Ground, by Avi
43. Blubber, by Judy Blume
44. Athletic Shorts, by Chris Crutcher
45. Crazy Lady, by Jane Leslie Conly
46. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
47. The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby, by George Beard
48. Rainbow Boys, by Alex Sanchez
49. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
50. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
51. Daughters of Eve, by Lois Duncan
52. The Great Gilly Hopkins, by Katherine Paterson
53. You Hear Me?, by Betsy Franco
54. The Facts Speak for Themselves, by Brock Cole
55. Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Green
56. When Dad Killed Mom, by Julius Lester
57. Blood and Chocolate, by Annette Curtis Klause
58. Fat Kid Rules the World, by K.L. Going
59. Olive’s Ocean, by Kevin Henkes
60. Speak, by Laurie Halse Anderson
61. Draw Me A Star, by Eric Carle
62. The Stupids (series), by Harry Allard
63. The Terrorist, by Caroline B. Cooney
64. Mick Harte Was Here, by Barbara Park
65. The Things They Carried, by Tim O’Brien
66. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred Taylor
67. A Time to Kill, by John Grisham
68. Always Running, by Luis Rodriguez
69. Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
70. Harris and Me, by Gary Paulsen
71. Junie B. Jones (series), by Barbara Park
72. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
73. What’s Happening to My Body Book, by Lynda Madaras
74. The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold
75. Anastasia (series), by Lois Lowry

76. A Prayer for Owen Meany, by John Irving
77. Crazy: A Novel, by Benjamin Lebert
78. The Joy of Gay Sex, by Dr. Charles Silverstein
79. The Upstairs Room, by Johanna Reiss
80. A Day No Pigs Would Die, by Robert Newton Peck
81. Black Boy, by Richard Wright
82. Deal With It!, by Esther Drill
83. Detour for Emmy, by Marilyn Reynolds
84. So Far From the Bamboo Grove, by Yoko Watkins
85. Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes, by Chris Crutcher
86. Cut, by Patricia McCormick
87. Tiger Eyes, by Judy Blume
88. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
89. Friday Night Lights, by H.G. Bissenger
90. A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L’Engle
91. Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George
92. The Boy Who Lost His Face, by Louis Sachar
93. Bumps in the Night, by Harry Allard
94. Goosebumps (series), by R.L. Stine
95. Shade’s Children, by Garth Nix
96. Grendel, by John Gardner
97. The House of the Spirits, by Isabel Allende
98. I Saw Esau, by Iona Opte
99. Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, by Judy Blume
100. America: A Novel, by E.R. Frank

This list and its progress will also be tracked via a page on the upper header of the blog.  Join me, if you’re so inclined!  Fuck censorship!

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